Education Course Descriptions

EDC 5030.SB Natural History for Early Childhood
1.5 units
The best nature-based early childhood teachers are knowledgeable about early childhood and local natural history. This course will focus on the natural history of the Central California Coast that most directly relates to being outdoors with children. Participants will learn about the flora, fauna and natural phenomena that intrigue young children. We’ll also consider how tracking, gathering wild edibles, crafting and telling stories can encourage exploration. We’ll discuss winter and spring natural history with a focus on keeping children engaged under hot and/or wet conditions.

EDC 5090.SB Nature-based Early Childhood Curriculum
3.0 units

This course will focus on the distinctive elements for connecting young children with nature aged three to six. The guiding framework will help teachers see how to connect children with nature in both developmentally and environmentally appropriate ways.

Topics will include: child-directed play inside, outside and beyond; natural play spaces as a source of inspiration; strategies for fostering an ecological identity & environmental literacy; and, ways to utilize nature to meet early learning standards.

EDC 5280.SB Ecology of Imagination in Childhood 
1.5 units
This course investigates ways in which children’s nature play can be used to invigorate the writing process. Making forts, hunting and gathering, constructing small worlds, going on adventures, and fantasy play are children’s instinctive ways of being in the natural world and these activities can be used as the basis for curriculum. We’ll use the surrounding neighborhood, beach and hills to reconnect the childhood play. Out of these natural world experiences, each participant will craft a finished piece of writing by the end of the week.

EDP 5580.SB Working with Parent & Community
1.5 units
Nature preschools and forest kindergartens are special kinds of places, different from conventional early childhood programs.  Parents, caretakers and community members, who may not be familiar with the mission and practices of nature-based outdoor programs, can benefit from education. Parents and other caretakers need to be prepared to provide appropriate clothes, do regular tick checks, and deal with bee stings. They may also be called on to volunteer in the school and to help with promotion and fundraising. We’ll consider how to partner with families and forge links to the wider community.  Communication is central to our work: we’ll hone our skills as we participate in mock parent conferences, examine and create materials that describe programs to families, and practice working with parents who have questions or concerns. We’ll spend time outdoors on several days, so on those days (see outline of days in syllabus) please come prepared with outdoor clothing and boots adequate for walking in fields and woods. Please pack a lunch on every Saturday

EDP 5600.SB Business Planning for Nature Preschools & Forest Kindergartens
3.0 units
This course will explore the basics of business planning for nature preschools and forest kindergartens. Because there are many approaches to these entities and other forms of early childhood environmental education (ECEE), no single business plan model will apply to all. However, by covering a core selection of business planning strategies and sharing our own diverse experiences, all students in EDP 5600.SB should come away with the ability to effectively plan for the business aspects of either a new nature preschool/forest kindergarten venture or an expansion of an existing program.

EDT 5100.SB Landscape Analysis & Design for Nature Play & Learning
1.5 units
This course explores how experience in nature promotes engagement with the early childhood standards by understanding the roles of the
teacher, the child, and the environment. It includes using and modifying the existing landscape, site assessment, analysis and schematic design as tools to study the strengths and weaknesses of your location for a nature-based early childhood program. The topics also include establishing boundaries, pathways, and destinations to support play and learning.

HDV 4550.SB Child Development & Learning
3 units
This class provides students with the opportunity to study and do research related to current child development theory and their applications in school and classroom contexts for children in grades K through 8.  Students learn to read and interpret professional journal articles in order to explore the influence of culture on child development and child rearing practices. Student will learn to conduct developmental observations and interviews with children. Primary topics are cognitive, emotional, social and moral development, moral education, the role of children in US culture, and children’s rights.

HDV 4581 Language Development & Acquisition
3 units
Credential candidates will develop knowledge of foundational theories, skills, and instructional practices necessary to make informed decisions regarding instruction, engagement and assessment that will ensure English language proficiency and academic progress for all students, especially English learners. Affective factors influencing students’ cognitive, social, and linguistic development will be addressed. Credential candidates will also be introduced to relevant federal and state laws, policies, and legal requirements governing the education and assessment of students who are designated as English language learners.

TEP 5040.SB Social Science & Children’s Experience
3 units
In this course, candidates will learn methods to make social studies a meaningful and powerful part of their classroom curriculum. Candidates will gain familiarity with developmentally-appropriate social studies topics and activities, and how to substantively integrate social studies with other disciplines in order to support more connected and effective learning experiences. Candidates will demonstrate their ability to teach the state-adopted content standards for Social Science. Candidates will learn how to engage students in social science inquiry and problem solving by developing significant themes and posing essential questions that require extended study and critical thinking in the areas of history, politics, culture, geography, community development, social justice, and the environment.

Candidates will learn how to support and guide their students with resources that will help them research and construct knowledge on these topics, and take social or political action when it is warranted.

TEP 5051-2.SB Reading Instruction in the Elementary School Classroom
3 units

In this course, candidates gain the knowledge and skills to provide balanced and comprehensive reading instruction for all students in self-contained, integrated, and inclusive classrooms. Candidates learn to address the needs of emergent, beginning and fluent readers using developmentally appropriate strategies. Relationships between oral and written discourse and language variation are addressed in order for candidates to begin to develop flexible literacy instruction strategies and skills to meet the needs of diverse students. Candidates reference social, cultural, economic, and political factors addressed in HDV 458 (Language Acquisition) that affect literacy development, for English learners as well as for students who are already fluent in the English language

TEP 5070.SB Real World Mathematics
3 units

Real World Mathematics uses an interdisciplinary, culturally responsive approach to teaching mathematics that enables candidates to engage and teach the CA Common Core Math Standards in a real world context to ALL students K-8. Candidates examine current research on teaching and learning mathematics and compare local state and national standards to develop a critical approach to teaching elementary school mathematics. This course provides opportunities for candidates to learn how children construct mathematical understanding, use basic arithmetic computation, concepts and symbols to solve common problems and apply them to novel problems. Candidates engage in critical dialogue to determine what teachers can do to create challenging and secure learning environments for their students to take intellectual risks and approach problems in meaningful ways.

Special attention will be paid to issues of equity, and how the development of language, literacy and mathematical understanding can be integrated in the math classroom. Candidates learn to plan and deliver specially designed mathematical instruction in English to English Language Learners. The course emphasizes an inquiry-based approach that includes the use of manipulative and representational models, cooperative learning, integration of language and writing and meaningful assessment of mathematical reasoning. Candidates learn ways to enhance English Language Development through these various strategies. Candidates learn to model, and encourage students to use multiple approaches to solve real world problems using mathematical reasoning and concrete, verbal, symbolic and graphic representation. The course will also encourage candidates to develop an understanding of how they construct their own mathematical knowledge thereby coming to appreciate the role of the affective and social domains in learning. Given such an appreciation, candidates will foster positive attitudes towards math, encourage students’ curiosity, flexibility and perseverance in solving math problems.

TEP 5100.SB Science: Discovery Teaching, Action Learning
3 units
This course will focus on the standards, methods, and materials for teaching science within the context of ecology with a focus on fostering English language development (including SDAIE and ELD), particularly the development of students’ science-related language. Critical thinking, problem solving, and problem posing are at the center of unit and lesson planning. Candidates plan and implement balanced instruction with knowledge of how physical, life, and earth science content standards are achieved in conjunction with investigation and experimentation. Candidates design instruction informed by students’ development and language usage. Candidates learn to use literature to teach students how science was and is learned—through hands-on experiment and discovery. Teaching students to protect and sustain ecological systems is considered central to the course.

This course supports the teacher (and therefore his/her students) in discovering the “scientist within” through developmentally appropriate real-world experiences. The course also addresses strategies that promote equal learning opportunities in the classroom for all students, including those with special needs and those who are traditionally underrepresented in science: women and the culturally, linguistically, racially, ethnically, and socioeconomically diverse.

TEP 5110.SB Language Arts Curricula: Theory & Methods
3 units
This course is designed to expand the credential candidates’ foundational learning from TEP 505 Reading Instruction in Elementary School Classrooms, by providing them with opportunities for learning the knowledge and skills necessary to develop and enact a comprehensive, integrated, and methodologically grounded Language Arts Program that supports access to the core curriculum for all students and ensures that they are able to meet or exceed the California Language Arts Content Standards. Particular attention is given to the development of comprehensive literacy instruction for English learners. Candidates will learn theories and methods of instruction for English Language Development (ELD) and Specially Designed Academic Instruction in English (SDAIE). Integrated instructional approaches to promote language and literacy development through reading, writing, listening, and speaking will be addressed. This course is designed to help credential candidates begin to develop and enact the skills, understandings and dispositions necessary to make decisions regarding instruction and curriculum that will ensure English language proficiency and academic progress for each student.

TEP 5121.SB Student Teaching with Professional Seminar I
12 units

This course is part of on-going professional development within the Antioch University Teacher Education and Master’s degree program.  The professional seminar provides student teachers with the support and critical feedback necessary for them to connect their practice with course principles and educational theory.  The seminar is an opportunity for participants to develop their professional support network by building stronger connections within their cohort.  Student teachers are strongly encouraged to share openly about their teaching experiences, both positive and negative, and to listen to each other with patience and care.

A weekly small group seminar is used to discuss procedures that are implemented in the student teaching placements, to analyze the results of implementation, and to examine issues that arise in the placement.  Completion of student teaching consists of meeting the eight Antioch Domains of Practice at least at the beginning level, as observed by the university supervisor and cooperating teacher and completing edTPA. Artifacts demonstrating progress in all 8 Domains are collected for presentation in a student teaching/professional development portfolio at the end of spring quarter.

Prerequisite(s):  Advancement to Student Teaching, TEP 5330

TEP 5130.SB The Arts in Culture & Learning
3 units
This course is designed to enable teacher candidates to understand the role art, artists, and cultural institutions can contribute to TK-6th grade education. Candidates are introduced to interpretive models for understanding, and applying art appreciation and making techniques within their future elementary classrooms. The course is rooted in the California and National Core Art Standards. Candidates learn how to integrate artistic methods into a multiple subject classroom setting. Candidates engage in direct art-making activities, reflective writing and discussion, and attend arts education activities in the community in order to better understand these strategies and processes to use them effectively in elementary school classrooms.

TEP 5151 Student Teaching with Professional Seminar II
5-12 units
This course is part of ongoing professional development within the Antioch University Teacher Education and Master’s degree programs. Candidates continue to engage in on-site full day student teaching Monday through Thursday under the supervision of a Cooperating Teacher and University Supervisor. The weekly whole and small group seminars are used to integrate each week’s teaching experience with theory and methods studied in the program, to analyze and discuss procedures implemented and the results of implementation in the student teaching placements to generate a personal theory of practice, and to examine issues that arise in the placement. Candidates also participate as “critical friends” in the development of professional portfolios. Completion of student teaching consists of progressing appropriately in the eight Domains of Practice as observed by the university supervisor and cooperating teacher (3-way form), completing at least two weeks of taking over full classroom responsibilities and presenting a professional portfolio documenting growth over time. (Expectations for student teaching are more fully explained in the Field Experience and Portfolio Guidelines Handbooks.)

TEP 5191 Educational Technology for Universal Design
3 units

The purpose of this course is to empower credential candidates to select and use technology to enhance student learning, to develop personal learning networks, and to explore new technologies to enable use of technology as a teaching and learning tool for effective instruction. Candidates will evaluate technology using learning theories, the Universal Design for Learning framework, and curricular standards. Candidates will explore contemporary topics relevant to technology including the Digital Divide, equity issues, safe Internet use, and social networking through hands-on learning, candidate demonstrations, and personal exploration. Special attention will be given to Universal Design as technology becomes a powerful way to address accessibility.

TEP 5311 Enhancing English Language Development with Literature
2 units
This course is designed to ensure academic and language proficiency for English learners and that participating teachers adhere to legal and ethical obligations for teaching English learners including the identification, reclassification and monitoring processes. Participating teachers will plan instruction for English learners based on students’ levels of proficiency, implementing one or more of the components of English Language Development (ELD): grade-level academic language instruction, ELD by proficiency level and/or content-based ELD. The instructional plans will involve literature and/or informational texts (per the Common Core State Standards) with language objectives that address language and literacy demands (e.g., language functions and forms, audience and purpose, academic vocabulary, and comprehension). Participating teachers will differentiate instruction for first- and second-language learners, taking into consideration prior knowledge, academic language and literacy levels as determined by student assessment data from multiple measures. They will also learn to use literature to advance students’ thinking about issues of prejudice, fairness, and equity. Finally, candidates will evaluate children’s and young adult (YA) literature in terms of its cultural relevance and linguistic appropriateness for students of diverse ages, cultural and linguistic backgrounds.

TEP 5330.SB Field Practicum
3-10 units
This field practicum is designed as a laboratory for TEP 5050, 5070 and 5380. Candidates are placed in schools where they observe, participate, and teach using the theories and strategies taught in these courses. In this course, candidates learn more about lesson planning and reflect upon their teaching. Candidates teach and learn about students from diverse cultural and language backgrounds. The practicum is designed to cover topics related to the development of reflective teaching practice.

TEP 5360.SB Foundations of Social Justice Education
4 units
This course provides an orientation to the philosophies of teaching and learning that guide the MEd/TC Program. A primary objective is to facilitate candidates’ beginning constructions of their professional identities as teachers in diverse classrooms. Candidates study foundations of philosophy, history, politics, pedagogy, sociology and purposes of public education in the US. Candidates review the demographics of student populations and how they are related to racism, classism, and other forms of bias and their opportunities. Candidates become familiar with the Common Core Standards in the context of Educational Reform. While developing their own philosophy of education, candidates learn how to establish a caring learning community based on the principles of equal inherent worth, and mutual respect. Candidates practice advocacy for democratic action.

TEP 5361 Foundations of Social Justice Education Lab
1 unit
This course supports the field aspects of TEP 5360, Foundations of Social Justice Education. Candidates work in schools to fulfill the fieldwork assignments within TEP 5360 and begin to use ethnographic methods to understand classroom cultures.

TEP 5370.SB Mediation and Conflict Resolution in Schools
3 units
In this theory and experiential course, students learn and practice basic counseling and collaborative conflict resolution skills. Candidates learn strategies for communicating with individuals and groups, particularly with people who differ from themselves in terms of culture, ethnicity, language, gender, gender identity, sexual preference and social class. Candidates explore different ways of utilizing these skills and implementing these concepts in a multicultural school and classroom setting. Candidates develop sensitivity to students’ unique needs and issues. Candidates learn and practice developmentally appropriate skills for grades K through 8. Candidates will also reflect on their experience as a member of a cohort, and begin to use the concepts, skills and theories presented in the course to maximize the group’s productivity.

TEP 5380.SB Classroom Organization: Theory & Practice
3 units
In this course, candidates study the social and developmental psychology and sociology of classrooms. They also examine the philosophy behind popular methods of “behavior management.” Classroom models from democratic to autocratic are studied while candidates observe and participate in assigned classrooms. Candidates reflectively construct an organization plan for their own practice.

TEP 6011 Social & Legal Dimensions of Special Education
2 units
This course provides candidates with information required to meet the needs of exceptional students. Content areas include state and federal special education legislation, exceptional learner characteristics, referral practice, and mainstreaming principles. As a result of this course, teacher candidates will understand their legal obligations with respect to students with special needs and will be able to clearly identify students for appropriate referral. Candidates will be able to advocate for the needs of special students and be aware of family issues with respect to disability.

TEP 6012 Teaching & Accommodating Students with Disabilities
1 unit
This course builds upon the knowledge gained by candidates in TEP 6011. Candidates will learn skills necessary to accommodate the special education student within a mainstream environment. Candidates learn informal assessment, instructional planning and evaluation, behavior encouragement techniques, mainstreaming principles, and consultation skills. As a result of this course, teacher candidates will be able to interface with special education personnel, implement and evaluate special learner programs, and work effectively with exceptional learners in the regular classroom environment.

TEP 6020.SB Advocacy & Activity for Healthy Children
3 units
This course covers knowledge about cultural and socioeconomic differences relative to nutrition, physical and mental health, and healthcare service issues. Candidates learn skills in working with students and families from diverse backgrounds for the purposes of providing effective interventions concerning health problems. Drug awareness and sexuality education programs are examined and candidates develop their positions on these issues. Candidates learn skills in identifying and reporting physical and psychological neglect and abuse, substance abuse, and information regarding various referral options. Candidates learn fitness activities, developmentally appropriate movement activities as defined in the National Physical Education Standards and the California Framework on Physical Education, and develop knowledge of locomotor and non-locomotor skills. Definitions and examples of health related physical fitness are introduced and discussed.

TEP 6131 Sociological & Curricular Perspectives in Schools as Organizations
4 units
This course explores schools as organizational systems from research literature. Students develop familiarity for how systems operate and perpetuate themselves. Attention will be given to the structural, political, historical, ecological and cultural context of schools. These dimensions of schools will be identified and critically analyzed. Students also embark on the comprehensive study (historical, social, political, economic and cultural aspects) of curriculum reform in the US and CA, in particular. They examine the effects of legislation and other political influences on curriculum and school systems. Particular emphasis is placed on the roles informal leadership can take in educational and other organizations. Students’ basic assumptions about schools are deconstructed.

TEP 6140 Foundations of Educational Research
3 units
This course is designed to introduce students to the issues central to educational and social research. In order to provide the skills and knowledge that allow students to become critical consumers of both theory and research, the course includes discussion of various research designs, especially action research and ethnography, and key elements of critical evaluation. In addition, students learn to search and locate sources and support for current policies and practices related to their professional interests.

Foundations of Educational Research begins with students’ questions concerning the policies, issues and conditions of contemporary organizations. The knowledge, perspectives, and practice they need to become critical consumers of theory and research are provided. Students are presented with a systematic study of current research and research methods for conducting educational and organizational research. The objectives in this course focus on the knowledge base, research techniques, and applications of appropriate forms of research that can be applied to improve one’s own professional practice. Additionally, students will establish the research topic that will become the subject of their theses or projects.

TEP 6141 Inquiry Project Planning
3 units
This course orients students to issues central to reflective teaching practice and action research. Throughout the course, students explore how theory informs practice and practice informs theory as they become critical consumers and creators of educational research to develop a coherent theory of practice. Thhe course emphasizes action research using ethnographic methods for classroombased research, which supports active construction of “graduate student researcher-roles” within a larger community of reflective practitioners. Students are taught how to use action research in support of state-adopted K-12 education across traditional and alternative public school settings through a hands-on approach to learning and teaching.

Objectives for this course focus on the techniques and applications of action research to improve ones own practice as an educator. Students will develop the research question and action plan for their Passion Week inquiry project by applying ethnographic methods in their everyday teaching practice. The course also hones awareness that research-based inquiry is a collaborative act; and that although each student ultimately constructs an individual Inquiry Project, that the project results from collaborative work, conversations, peer review; and is the
beginning of an ongoing, life-long conversation within the larger professional community.

TEP 6160 Critical Evaluation of Educational Research
3 units
In this course, students refine their ability to evaluate critically the reliability, validity, and implication of educational research. They become familiar with logical processes of problem conceptualization and hypothesis formulation. Qualitative and quantitative research methods are introduced. Both theoretical and practical issues of school-based and organizational research are examined. Students design their theses/projects; refine their introduction, literature reviews, and methods chapters. Prerequisite: TEP 6140.

TEP 6161 Inquiry Project Data Collection & Beginning Analysis
2 units
This course is designed as the second phase of the graduate seminar designed to support the work required for the M.Ed. Passion Week Project (Master’s Thesis). It follows the prerequisite of TEP 6141 which is the planning phase of the inquiry projects, and it precedes TEP 6191 which is the seminar designed to support M.Ed. students as they complete and assemble the final inquiry project. As such, students will build on the Inquiry Project Plan form developed in TEP 6141 in order to accomplish the work of TEP 6161. The course emphasizes presentation, analysis and organization of artifacts in ways that will support the final assembly of the Inquiry Project. Action research and ethnography are methods for analysis of artifacts gathered.

TEP 6170 Professional Intensives
1 unit each
This intensive module will have changing topics related to current student issues, recent legislation, and emerging educational research. For example, one quarter’s intensive might focus on educational accountability and assessment (including examining the effects of high stakes testing on diverse student populations). Other topics could include curricular issues, special student populations, health, standards, educational technology, ethics in education, etc.

TEP 6171 Access & Equity for Special Populations
1 unit
This course builds upon the knowledge gained by candidates in their preliminary credential program (at Antioch – TEP 6011 and 6012). Candidates will learn new skills necessary to provide equitable experiences and accommodations for the special education student within an inclusive environment. Candidates use informal assessment, instructional planning and evaluation, behavior encouragement techniques, mainstreaming principles, and consultation skills. As a result of this course, candidates will be able to interface with special education personnel, implement and evaluate special learner programs, and work effectively with exceptional learners in the regular classroom environment. They will use their knowledge of legal obligations with respect to students with special needs and will be able to clearly identify students for appropriate referral. Candidates will be able to advocate for the needs of special students and be aware of family issues with respect to disability, culture and language.

TEP 6173 Differentiated Instruction for Universal Access
2 units
This course supports the development of the induction candidate’s pedagogical content knowledge in all areas of the curriculum. The course reviews the interconnections between creating and maintaining a caring learning environment and students’ access to the curriculum defined by the CA Content Standards for the candidate’s teaching assignment. Candidates explore strategies to differentiate by learning modalities, applying universal design methods and research based strategies for English Language Development. Candidates practice SDAIE, flexible grouping and brain-based strategies they have learned in their preliminary preparation year. Candidates also advance their technological knowledge through application of online resources. Each candidate integrates these technology-related tools into the educational experience of students, including those with special needs. By meeting course learning goals, the candidate will fulfill the pedagogy area of their Individualized Inquiry Plan.

TEP 6180 Leadership in Educational Reform
4 units
Leadership is studied as a social construct for both classrooms and wider contexts. Candidates consider the potential for formal and informal leadership in the context of the professional role of educators. Historic and contemporary school leadership and change efforts are studied and their methods are identified and analyzed in terms of their applicability to contemporary school change leadership. Effective communication, presentation, persuasion, and interpersonal effectiveness skills are identified and practiced. Candidates construct a change plan in their interest area that involves their work in leadership. Reflection upon oneself as both a member of society and as a leader, and identifying strengths and areas to strengthen in one’s service as a leader are fostered.

TEP 6190 Producing & Disseminating Educational Research
3 units
In this course, students begin to carry out the research method and purpose developed and refined during TEP6140 and TEP6160. By this point, students have clear research questions, an appropriate methodology and a literature review that is close to final draft form and uses at least 20 sources. Class meetings focus on problem solving, writing, data analysis, ethics and preparation for the “Public Conversations.” By the end of this quarter, students should have relatively complete draft versions of the first 3 chapters and an outline or beginning draft of the results or findings chapter.

Prerequisite(s): TEP 6140 and 6160

TEP 6191 Inquiry Project Data Collection & Analysis
3 units
In this course, students continue to carry out the research plan developed and refined during TEP 6141 and TEP 6161. Students use artifacts, journals and relevant data collected during their placement to develop their theory of practice. Collection of artifacts and reflective analysis occur on an ongoing basis during fieldwork experiences. By the end of this quarter, students will have assembled a collection of field-based artifacts that support their reflection on practice related to their focus questions. Students use electronic communication to read and critique each other’s work.

TEP 6211 Thesis Study
6 units
Students review central features of their learning and receive support in the completion of their projects, which will incorporate these features. Students study and practice professional data interpretation, writing, organization, and presentation skills. Methods of research publication are studied and candidates are encouraged to receive assistance toward publishing their work. Prerequisite(s): TEP 6140, 6160 and 6190 and approval of faculty advisor.

TEP 6212 Portfolio Development
6 units
TEP 6212 is the Action Research-based Portfolio Development course.  It is the LAST course of the series of courses designed to guide students through their Inquiry Project and into professional “Conversations” with invited members of the community, faculty, etc. Students will complete selection and analyses of artifacts, develop their “Theory of Practice” and write/assemble their project into a portfolio format using the Inquiry Project Rubric.  During this time, students are to show evidence that they have worked regularly with the peer groups formed in TEP 6212; and they should be communicating regularly with instructors about their progress.  Finally students present their work in the context of a professional “conversation” Prerequisite(s): TEP 616A and approval of faculty advisor.

TEP 6224-6226 Professional Inquiry & Collegial Observation
2 units each
Throughout the Induction Program Clear Credential candidates take Professional Inquiry and Collegial Observation (PICO). The main purpose of this course is for candidates to become familiar with the Antioch Domains (CSTPs + 2) and to develop an Individualized Learning Plan (ILP) that will facilitate their growth around these standards. Candidates are asked to think about the opportunities they have to practice and evaluate their own teaching in relation to the domains and to plan traditional and alternative ways to meet the standards. Candidates formalize this thinking in an Individualized Learning Plan, which identifies areas for of growth for the candidate’s teaching practice, plans for how the growth will take place, and includes ways in which the growth might be documented and assessed. Another purpose of PICO is to help candidates find and build professional relationships, which will help support them as they begin in the profession. They are taught collegial coaching practices and a community of practice is established within the class. Candidates are also encouraged to learn about in-service opportunities in their schools and in the larger teaching community, form collegial relationships, and take additional course work to support their application and integration of learning in these areas. This is the first course of the PICO sequence, which supports the candidates throughout the year.

TEP 6300.SB Social Justice & Educational Reform
3 units
Contemporary research and practice related to progressive education movements are studied, including humanistic, student-centered, democratic, environmental, character, radical pedagogy, moral education, de-schooling, and charter schools. Students explore their own assumptions about these approaches and write a supported essay on their approach to teaching and school reform. The concept and practices of activism within and outside of the system are introduced. During this course students also form a unique collegial support group for pursuing the master’s degree as experienced teachers. Antioch’s social justice mission and its impact in the educational program are shared in this course.
Prerequisite(s): Admission into the Master of Arts in Education Program in Social Justice and Educational Leadership.

TEP 6310 Resilience & the School Community
3 units
This course will focus on supporting personal resilience and building community to enhance the development of positive health and academic behaviors. Resilience and community building strategies will be taught and practiced. Students will participate in personal reflection and curriculum development for the purpose of learning to strengthen their own and their students’ resilience.

TEP 6311 Resilience Education
1 unit
Candidates will apply knowledge and skills acquired in their preliminary credential preparation to provide comprehensive support for students’ physical, cognitive, emotional and social well-being based on an understanding of relationships between student health, a caring learning environment and discrimination. Topics for this course focus on community building in classrooms and schools as a mediating variable in developing positive behaviors and a positive disposition toward learning. Candidates use methods learned during their preliminary credential preparation year to promote respect, value differences, and mediate conflicts. Each candidate will learn to promote personal, classroom and school safety through informal assessment, instructional planning, and the implementation of appropriate prevention and intervention strategies. The PORT model of Resilience Education will be introduced and practiced. Each candidate will demonstrate how to access local and community resources to support all students. Participants in the course will use personal reflection and curriculum development for the purpose of strengthening their own and their students’ resilience.
Prerequisite(s): Completion of a preliminary credential.

TEP 6320 Practicum in Educational Inquiry
3 units
Students analyze data or implement the projects they designed in TEP 619. Students continue to engage in research, comparing their findings with significant literature. This research is a culmination of the learning students have done in core courses in preparation for their own projects. Students focus on the development of solid research practices based upon their understandings of the social, political, historical and cultural environments they are studying. They receive support from faculty and peers as they write and analyze their data for their thesis or project.
Prerequisite(s): TEP 614, 616 and 619.

TEP 6350 Research Ethics for Human Subjects
1 unit

This course, which is completed online, provides students with the ethical and legal information they need in order to conduct research with human subjects.

All students conducting research involving human participants must complete the ethics modules through the Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative (CITI) Program and have a current research ethics certificate on file. These modules address the ethical considerations pertinent to research with human subjects in the behavioral and social sciences. These include Research With Protected Populations, Ethical Principles, Belmont Report, History and Ethical Principles, Avoiding Group Harms, Defining Research with Human Subjects, Assessing Risk, Informed Consent, Privacy and Confidentiality and Conflicts of Interest and others.

Additional Information about the course: Each student establishes contact with the CITI Program and completes the ethics modules before any data collection is undertaken. Instructions for accessing CITI modules and for overview of the Institutional Review Board (IRB) process are provided during the first and second sessions of TEP 6140 or TEP 6141 in the Fall Quarter.

TEP 6360 Exploring Creativity
3 units
This creativity course focuses on understanding creativity from a multi-disciplinary perspective. Course content includes definitions of creativity, methods of recognizing and motivating creative expression within organizations and within families. This course includes consideration of multiple resources, examples and methods that foster creative expression. Through exploration of creativity as a social, psychological, organizational, historic and educational phenomenon, students will construct a definition of creativity, become aware of examples of the creative process and barriers to creativity in modern organizations and develop action plans for personal and organizational creativity as appropriate to each student’s goals.

TEP 6370.SB Small Group Leadership
3 units
Small Group Leadership theory and practice is relevant for all who work within organizations or who participate in small groups. This course is highly interactive and requires self-study as well as application of systematic observation of at least one working group. Participants in the course will demonstrate understanding of the task and maintenance functions of groups, and how leadership is diffused among members. Participants study leadership functions, social power theory and the dynamics of groups including how norms are established, how to manage effective meetings and how groups form and mature over time.

TEP 6501 – 6506 Fieldwork with Mentoring
1 unit each

An essential component of the Induction Program is individualized site-based mentoring for the purpose of helping Clear Credential candidates meet their individualized growth goals as detailed on their Individualized Learning Plans (ILP). This course requires candidates to identify a site-based mentor, and meet with the mentor weekly for support in meeting their growth goals. Candidates and mentors work together to create goals, appropriate to the candidate’s developmental needs. Candidates are expected to document their meetings and how the meetings contributed to individual growth. Mentors and candidates might do observations, participate in conferences together, co-plan lessons, or any other activity that might help the candidate grow. In addition to working with their mentor, candidates may participate in other mentoring activities, such as workshops, classes, meetings with specialists, and other forms of targeted professional development designed to help them with their ILPs.

TESE 5090.SB Assessment in Special Education
3 units

The purpose of this course is to expose students to a variety of assessment methods appropriate for individuals with mild to moderate disabilities, including those who are culturally and linguistically diverse. This course will explore a range of assessment techniques, based on an ecological model of assessment which recognizes the impact of the assessment context on student performance. Emphasis will be on those instruments and assessment methods which provide direction for instruction as well as diagnosis, including, but not restricted to: traditional psychometric instruments, curriculum-based assessment, observation, criterion-referenced assessment, and other alternative assessment techniques. Participants will engage in discussions about assessment practices and patterns of language use among cultural and linguistically diverse populations, to include English learners, that may be misunderstood as language deficiencies. The dilemma of relying solely on traditional assessment instruments, such as standardized tests is discussed, and a variety of alternative assessment methods are explored. Participants will learn to administer standardized and informal academic achievement assessments and how to write a follow-up assessment report.

TESE 5110 Language Arts Curricula: Theory & Methods
2units
This course is designed to expand credential candidates’ foundational learning from TEP 5051 and TEP 5052: Reading Instruction in Elementary School Classrooms by providing them with opportunities for learning the knowledge and skills necessary to develop and enact a comprehensive, integrated, and methodologically grounded Language Arts Program that supports access to the core curriculum for all students and ensures that they are able to meet or exceed the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts (CCSS-ELA) and the California English Language Development (ELD) Standards. Particular attention is given to the development of comprehensive literacy instruction for English Learners. Candidates will learn theories and methods of instruction for English Language Development (ELD) and Specially Designed Academic Instruction in English (SDAIE). Integrated instructional approaches to promote language and literacy development through reading, writing, listening, and speaking will be addressed. Finally, this course is designed to help credential candidates begin to develop and enact the skills, understandings and dispositions necessary to make decisions regarding instruction and curriculum that will ensure English language proficiency and academic progress for each student.

TESE 5121 Student Teaching Mild/Moderate with Professional Seminar I
12 units

Or

TESE 5122 Special Education Seminar I
3 units
(for candidates who already possess a basic teaching credential)
Candidates begin on-site daily student teaching under the supervision of a Cooperating Teacher and University Supervisor. They begin to assume full responsibilities for the class. The required weekly seminar continues to integrate each week’s teaching experience with theory and methods studied in the Program. Culturally responsive and individualized instruction and teaching in both general and special education settings are reviewed and discussed in the context of candidates’ teaching experiences. Candidates continue to learn legal and professional requirements and expectations for the Individualized Education Programs of their students. Candidates’ questions are explored with peers and instructor in a supportive, problem-solving context.

TESE 5151 Student Teaching Mild/Moderate with Professional Seminar II
12 units

Or

TESE 5152 Special Education Seminar II
3 units

This course is part of ongoing professional development within the Antioch University Teacher Education and Master’s degree program. Candidates continue to engage in on-site daily student teaching in a setting with students with mild/moderate disabilities under the supervision of a Cooperating Teacher and University Supervisor. The required weekly seminar continues to integrate each week’s teaching experience with theory and methods studied in the Program. Candidates take over all class responsibilities for at least a two-week period. A weekly small group seminar is used to discuss procedures that are implemented in the student teaching placements. Culturally responsive instruction and teaching with mutual respect and care are reviewed with peers and instructor in a supportive, problem-solving context.

TESE 5160.SB Understanding & Teaching Students with Mild & Moderate Disabilities I
4 units
The purpose of this course is to provide candidates the knowledge and skills to meet the needs of students with mild and moderate disabilities through effective teaching methodologies, instructional strategies, interventions, accommodations, adaptations and modifications to core curriculum. Content areas include: use of research based practices, observable phenomena and ways to manage them, ecological assessment and considerations, planning and organizing instruction/curriculum, use of assessment (academic, standardized, ecological, observation) to inform instruction, observable phenomena, and integration of technology, including assistive technology. Emphasis is on adapting and implementing instructional techniques/materials, based on assessment, for learners with diverse needs and backgrounds to enhance development in the areas of: literacy, written expression, spelling, mathematics, social studies, science, the arts, study skills, and transition related skills. Overall the course provides Teacher Candidates with instructional competence, collaborative skills, and a strong knowledge base that can be used in service to individuals with disabilities in our community.

TESE 5170.SB Understanding & Teaching of Students with Mild & Moderate Disabilities II
4 units
The purpose of this course is to provide candidates the knowledge and skills to meet the needs of students with mild and moderate disabilities through effective teaching methodologies, instructional strategies, interventions, accommodations, adaptations and modifications to core curriculum. Content areas include: use of research based practices, observable phenomena and ways to manage them, ecological assessment and considerations, planning and organizing instruction/curriculum, use of assessment (academic, standardized, ecological, observation) to inform instruction, observable phenomena, and integration of technology, including assistive technology. Emphasis is on adapting and implementing instructional techniques/materials, based on assessment, for learners with diverse needs and backgrounds to enhance development in the areas of: literacy, written expression, spelling, mathematics, social studies, science, the arts, study skills, and transition related skills. Overall the course provides Teacher Candidates with instructional competence, collaborative skills, and a strong knowledge base that can be used in service to individuals with disabilities in our community.

TESE 5180.SB Family Dynamics & Communication for Special Education Services
3 units
The purpose of this course is to provide candidates with theory, general principles, and procedures for fostering collaborative partnerships among families, professionals, students, and other stakeholders that lead to outcomes of individual and mutual empowerment. In-class activities, discussions, course readings, and assignments will be used to facilitate understanding of research, recommended practices, and family perspectives concerning parent-professional partnerships. In addition, the interaction of culture and disability will be explored. A framework for addressing problems or conflicts that often arise between service providers and clients from different cultures will be discussed.

TESE 5192 Assistive Technology Applications for Students with Mild to Moderate Disabilities
1 unit
This course will explore the use of assistive technologies in schools, including their access, use and control in a democratic society; their use for development of problem solving, critical thinking, and creativity; and their integration into the school curriculum for students with mild to moderate disabilities.

Special educator course participants will specifically learn to use technology to facilitate the teaching and learning process for students with disabilities. They will learn about the terms, trends, history and current information based on applications of technology and assistive and adaptive devices for working with students in an educational setting. Emphasis will be placed on course participants learning the various low tech and high tech technology tools that are available to assist students with mild to moderate disabilities in an educational setting. Readings, lectures, and assignments will present definitions and instructionally relevant characteristics of students with mild to moderate disabilities. The course will also emphasize principles of effective methods for utilizing technology to effectively adapt instruction, curriculum, and assessments to meet the unique educational needs of students.

TESE 5361 Exploratory Practicum in Special Education I
1 unit
In this course candidates have planned observations and practicum experiences with the full range of the service delivery systems in special education. They interact with the full diversity of grades/ages, federal disability categories and the continuum of special education services for students with mild to moderate disabilities. Through interviews and observations, candidates explore the variety of services provided to individuals with disabilities in school and other community service settings, observing professionals in a variety of roles.

TESE 5362 Exploratory Practicum in Special Education II
1 unit
This course is a continuation of TESE 5361. In TESE 5362 candidates have planned experiences and/or interactions with the full range of the service delivery system and the providers of such services. These experiences reflect the full diversity of grades/ages, federal disability categories and the continuum of special education services for students with mild to moderate disabilities. Through interviews and observations, candidates explore the variety of services provided to individuals with disabilities in and out of the school setting.

TESE 5380.SB Comprehensive Behavior Assessment & Positive Behavior Support
3 units

In this course, candidates study the research and practices of social and academic Positive Behavior Support with exceptional pupils in special education and inclusive settings. They learn theoretical and applied perspectives on behavior support; how to conduct comprehensive ecological and behavioral assessments, consistent with Positive Behavior Support; and how to derive multi-element Positive Behavior Support plans from such assessments. This course also covers ethical standards and professional conduct related to behavior support practices for individuals with disabilities. In addition, legal requirements, practices and procedures relating to Title 5, California Code of Regulations “Behavioral Interventions for Special Education Students” (no longer required but still used throughout the State) and those pertaining to Federal law (IDEIA ’04) will be infused throughout this course and students will have a working knowledge of the requirements of local practices and Federal law.

Classroom behavior support theory and practice, as well as the design and delivery of Positive behavior Support (PBS) programs, will be presented in the context of a culturally and ethnically diverse society. In addition, actively soliciting, welcoming and valuing family expertise is considered integral to this course – for the Functional Behavioral Assessment and for the design and implementation of PBS.

TESE 5410.SB Introduction to Autism Spectrum Disorder
1 unit

This 1-unit course provides an overview of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). The focus of this course is aligned with the three California ASD Standards: (1) Characteristics of Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD); (2) Teaching, Learning and Behavior Strategies for Students with ASD and (3) Collaborating with Other Service Providers and Families. Course content is intended to complement and extend ASD competency development imbedded within the Special Education Mild/Moderate Credential Program. Course requirements will include completion of core articles on ASD; in-class group work on vignettes of various learners’ with ASD; and the critique, design and implementation of Scientifically Based Practices (SBPs) for educating students with ASD. This course will be presented in the context of a culturally and ethnically diverse society. In addition, actively soliciting, welcoming and valuing family expertise is considered integral to this course.

TESE 5411 Autism Spectrum Disorders
1 unit

This 1-unit course provides an overview of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). The focus of this course is aligned with the three California ASD Standards:

  1. Characteristics of Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)
  2. Teaching, Learning and Behavior Strategies for Students with ASD and
  3. Collaborating with Other Service Providers and Families.

Course content is intended to complement and extend ASD competency development imbedded within the Special Education Mild/Moderate Credential Program. Course requirements will include:

  1. Completion of core articles on ASD
  2. In-class group work on vignettes of various learners’ with ASD, and
  3. The critique, design and implementation of Scientifically Based Practices (SBPs) for educating students with ASD.

TESE 6013 Individualized Education Design & Policy Implementation
2 units
The focus of this course is to learn to implement special education law, specifically the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), and its implications for school contexts. Candidates will learn how to prepare for and coordinate IEP meetings, including working closely with families, students, colleagues in regular and special education, and outside service providers. They understand the connections between assessment and instruction, and are able to design effective instructional plans to meet student needs. They learn to write appropriate short and long term goals and objectives and plan comprehensive programs to coordinate all aspects of a student’s educational program.

 

 

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